Recessive Mutations

Brouke Charcoal

History of the Brouke Charcoal

Charcoals arrived at various herds throughout America during the 1960's and 1970's, and generally were named after the owner of the ranch. There are several different strains of the Charcoal gene, although some are likely the same as others, but the distinct recessive Charcoal Mutation in the UK is the Brouke Charcoal, first born on the ranch of Betty Brouke, from California, in the early 1960's.

The Homozygous Recessive Charcoal (two charcoal genes) is a grey-charcoal colouration all over it's body and belly-fur, producing the 'wrap-around' Charcoal colouration over the animals grotzen (strip of fur in the back), hips, shoulders and also belly strip. Where only one Charcoal gene is present in an animal, making it Heterozygous Recessive Charcoal, NO discolouration or Charcoal colouration is seen on the animal.

A Standard carrying Charcoal looks like a Standard, and has a WHITE belly strip.

 

Genetics of the Charcoal

The Charcoal is a simple recessive Mutation, similar to the Sapphire and Violet, which only shows itself fully in the Homozygous state. A Heterozygous Charcoal, or a 'Charcoal Carrier' will resemble whatever the 'base' colouration the animal is which carries the single Charcoal gene. If this was a Standard, the chinchilla would look like a Standard, etc, etc

Where cc = Homozygous Brouke Charcoal

here Cc = Heterozygous Brouke Charcoal (A Charcoal Carrier)

Where CC = Standard

Punnet Square for Charcoal x Standard

c

c

C

Cc - Standard Charcoal Carrier

Cc - Standard Charcoal Carrier

C

Cc - Standard Charcoal Carrier

Cc - Standard Charcoal Carrier

 

Punnet Square for Charcoal x Standard Charcoal Carrier

c

c

c

cc - Charcoal

cc - Charcoal

C

Cc- Standard Charcoal Carrier

Cc- Standard Charcoal Carrier

 

Punnet Square for Standard Charcoal Carrier x Standard Charcoal Carrier

c

C

c

cc - Charcoal

Cc - Standard Charcoal Carrier

C

Cc - Standard Charcoal Carrier

CC - Standard

 

Breeding Charcoals

When breeding Charcoals, there are several factors and aspects of them which should be considered. In the UK they are generally the weakest of all the Mutations, being very small, narrow throughout, and in most cases heavily crossed with other Mutations such as Beige and Black Velvet, without the vigour and quality bred into them from top quality Standards.

They generally have a brownish caste over them, and their natural matt, dull appearance is not as appealing as similar 'shiny' Mutations such as Ebonies.

The emergence of the Ebony Mutation is in effect the biggest threat to the Recessive Brouke Charcoal, since some Medium or Medium-Dark Ebonies resemble Charcoals, and they can easily be mistaken, leading to contaminated Charcoal lines...

Charcoals, being a simple recessive Mutation like the Sapphire and Violet Mutations, are challenging to breed since a breeder must constantly outcross to Standards, and then linebreed back to Charcoal stock to keep the colouration.

The best way to produce quality Recessive Mutations, as has been stated for Sapphire and Violet, is to breed them to top quality Standard animals which possess all the attributes you want to see in your Charcoals. The best way to do this is to cross your Charcoals to the best possible Standards to breed Charcoal Carriers, select the best of these, and cross them together. This will mean only 1 in 4 babies born from a Charcoal Carrier x Charcoal Carrier mating are actually Charcoals, but they should be strong, healthy, and possess the characteristics you are selecting for.

 

Exhibiting Charcoals

Generally Charcoals are weak, small, narrow chinchillas with poor fur qualities and are off-colour. At the 2003 NCS National Show Richard judged the best Charcoal which has been exhibited for a long time, which was large, blocky, and only slightly down in colour (this animal gained a second ribbon!). It will take much effort form a few dedicated individuals with plenty of resources to get Charcoals up to an adequate show quality.

 

Combinations of Mutations with the Brouke Charcoal

The Brouke Charcoal is a Mutation which generally is the weakest of the recessive Mutations, and has been combined with Black, Beige and Brown-Velvet mutations for many years. Charcoals are currently suffering due to greater interest in the Ebony, and the corssing and 'contamination' of the recessive Brouke Charcoal lines with Ebony blood. Some of the different 'blends' of colour combinations are listed below;

Click on the links to see pictures where available in our 'Mutation Combinations' section of this Website

Combination

Known as in UK

Known as in US

Description of the Combination

Seen on UK Show tables?

Beige + Charcoal

">Light Pastel

-

A Light Pastel is a combination of Beige and recessive Brouke Charcoal. The Pastel chinchilla has it's matt-beige colouration spreading evenly over the entire animal, including the belly fur, and has the Beige's eye and ear colouration.

Infrequently

Black Velvet + Charcoal

">Char-Black

-

A Char-Black is a combination of recessive Brouke Charcoal and Black Velvet. It is a matt-black colouration all over the animal including the belly fur. It is exhibited in the 'Self-Black' class with Ebonies, since these can often not be discerned from one another phenotypically.

Rare

Beige + Black Velvet + Charcoal

">Dark Pastel

-

A Dark Pastel is a combination of Beige, Black Velvet and Recessive Brouke Charcoal. The Dark Pastel chinchilla has it's matt Brown-Velvet colouration spread evenly over the entire animal, including the belly fur, and has the Beige's eye and ear colouration. This mutation strongly resembles the Tan (Ebony + Beige_ so in future may be judged in a 'Self-Brown' class.

Infrequently

Wilson White + Charcoal

Char-White?

-

Not seen on UK Show tables. Would imagine the mosaic veiling of the guard hair and charcoal fur coming through the White fur would spread to include the belly fur. Would strongly resemble a Wilson White or Black-White cross unless veiling was marked in the belly fur. Would probably be judged in the Wilson White class.

Not seen

Charcoal + Sapphire

Char-Sapphire, or Solid Sapphire

Solid-Sapphire, or Sapphire wrap

I can't think of any good reason to combine these two weak recessive Mutations together, but would imagine that the resultant would be a matt-royal blue coloured chinchilla, all over it's body. This chinchilla would likely have very poor fur quality, due to the combination of two recessive mutations.

Not seen.

Charcoal + Violet

Char-Violet, or Solid-Violet

Solid-Violet, or Violet Wrap

A Char-Violet would be a chinchilla which resembled a matt textured Violet, and was this colouration all over it's body; an infulence from the matt-grey colouration of the Brouke Charcoal genes. These Mutations have not appeared on UK show tables but it is expected that they will have poor fur qualities, due to the double combination of recessive genes.

Not seen

Ebony + Charcoal

Char-Ebony?

Ebony

Charcoal gives a matt-grey colouration all over a chinchillas body and belly fur. Ebony gives a shiny-black colouration all over a chinchiillas fur, including the belly fur. I can see no benefit to combining these Mutations.

Not Seen

 

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